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MitchMan calls for Valorant to honor CS match-fixing bans


CS:GO match-fixing has been in and out of the news for months, now, with more and more players catching bans for their part in manipulating match results.

Most recently, Sebastian "retchy" Tropiano and Kevin "4pack" Przypasniak have been issued five-year bans for fixing matches during their CS careers.

Neither player will be able to compete in Counterstrike for the next five years, but both have them have already jumped ship to the newest tactical shooter, Valorant.

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Neither retchy nor 4pack are on a tier-one Valorant roster, but both are competing regularly in tournaments, with the hopes of hitting the top level of the game.

A lot of Valorant personalities don't take too kindly to this, as a five-year removal from a game they don't play doesn't seem like a stiff punishment.

MitchMan, a Valorant caster and Jaxon partner, took to Twitter to call on Valorant tournament organizers to take action against players accused of fixing matches in other games.

"ESIC bans guarantee these players won't be competing in CS for the duration," he wrote. "Now it's time for the VALORANT TOs, Orgs & players to step it up and recognise + enforce these bans."

Esports bans are tough. Counterstrike and Valorant are direct competitors, so you can see why one tournament organizer wouldn't ban a player based on their action in another game.

At the same time, both games are very similar. Should a ban from pro play in one game trigger a ban from all games? It's a difficult argument, and one that has valid points on both sides.

It seems like ESIC did their due diligence with this investigation, but setting the precedent of honoring all bans is tough. What if, in the future, a bad-faith investigation takes place and finds innocent players guilty?

Do all tournament organizers trust the investigation process of their competitors? It's tricky.

Let us know what you think about the issue on Twitter @JaxonMVP.