Team BDS Academy's Crownshot has been suspended in the LFL for two games for using 'spicy' language. The AD carry previously played for SK Gaming and Team Vitality.
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Crownie suspended 2 games for allegedly calling solo queue player ‘ape’


Riot Games have issued a competitive ruling on professional AD Carry Jus “Crownie” Marusic on June 29, ahead of Team BDS Academy’s second LFL game of the week.

The LEC’s ruling follows Crownie’s use of objectionable language while playing League of Legends solo queue. Said language is covered under Rule 9.1.10, which forbids any team member from using “obscene, foul, vulgar, insulting, threatening, abusive, libelous, slanderous, defamatory or otherwise offensive or objectionable” language.

Team BDS have addressed the issue and noted that LEC AD carry Matthew “xMatty” Coombs will replace him. Therefore, xMatty will be on double duty in the LEC and the LFL until July 1.

Why was Crownie suspended?

When inquiring about the incident, content creator Nick “LS” De Cesare discovered why: in a Discord message, Crownie told him that he allegedly called a random solo queue player an “ape.”

The word would fall under the rule under specific circumstances if there is no room for doubt. In some contexts, a two-game suspension would be a slap on the wrist.

However, Crownie added on LS’s Twitch chat that it was a “random Platinum III” player that he encountered while levelling a smurf in solo queue.

If proven true, any alleged offense was not intentional; instead, it would be another episode of pro player frustration at poor (or abysmal) gameplay.

Crownie states that the incident occurred in a Platinum 3 game. Taken from LS's stream.
Crownie also adds that it was on smurf queue. He must have been leveling an account.

On one hand, a pro player’s competitive heat in solo queue is nothing new. If anything, notable suspensions have occurred ahead of the European LCS’ inception in 2013.

On the other, solo queue players have deliberately trolled players to this day. At times, pros have reached breaking points, albeit less frequently since 2014.

By the way, what’s up with this? Is there some inconsistency in the rule’s application?

Crownie highlights that, apparently, pros have written things that were "300 times worse" without repercussions.

Jaxon's Take

That wouldn’t have happened if Europe had its Champions Queue server. On the other hand, pro players might be collecting warnings like Pokemon gym badges at this point, so they might have stacked up.

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